Friday, June 24, 2011

Weekly Quotes Part 25


Goddess in Older Women


Fundamentalists define women as either good women or whores. A woman who is desired does not have to feel desire herself in order to be blamed if a man finds her desirable, even if she is raped. (172)


There is a thin line between being treated as a courtesan and used as a prostitute, and one swiftly becomes the other through loss of beauty or a protector. (173)


In the physical and economic world, if I give you something, then I no longer have it. Wisdom and love behave altogether differently: if I give you my love or wisdom, both of us can have it. Even more remarkable, you may pass it on and not only still retain it, but it will grow with each transaction. The more we give away, the more there is and the more we have. Another remarkable quality is that if I give you my wisdom and it rings true in you, what I gave you was really already in you, and you recognized it as your own. (203)


The Places That Scare You

Bodhisattvas are to be found among thieves and prostitutes and murders.  (90)

There is no act that is inherently virtuous or nonvirtuous. .  .  When we practice discipline with flexibility, we become less moralistic and more tolerant  (96)

The teacher’s love for the student manifests as compassion.  The student’s love of the teacher is devotion.  (117)

As we continue to train, we evolve beyond the little me who continually seeks zones of comfort.  We gradually discover that we are big enough to hold something that is neither lie nor truth, neither pure nor impure, neither bad nor good.  (122)

Good Morning, Midnight

The truth is improbable, the truth is fantastic, it’s in what you think is in a distorting mirror that you see the truth.  (390, Jean Rhys Complete Novels)

You’re not old.  But you’ve got where you’re afraid to be young.  (449, ibid)







Rainbow Valley


[T]he shyest of men can sometimes be quite audacious in moonlight.  (88)

[R]arest thing in the world—a parson who can think.  (119)

I often find myself chuckling over something a character says in Montgomery's novels. Susan, especially, says some amusing things about poets and poetry and I often wonder if Montgomery isn't making jokes at her own expense or if there was someone in her life who felt this way about writing.

Garland of Love


[L]ove goes through things because the caring that love embodies is willing to go on the journey, even to the depths of difficulty and despair with another human being.  (June 17)

As healthy human beings our appropriate response would be to cherish people and us things, but our culture presses us instead to use people and treasure things. (June 18)



Simple Abundance

We late bloomers can risk more because at this point nobody really expects anything spectacular from us anymore.  (June 21)

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